Canadian Policy

The Senate expenses war may be over, but the hostilities linger on

We have all heard or read stories about those Japanese soldiers who went into hiding, combat ready, in the jungles of Indonesia or the Philippines as the Second World War was ending, only to re-emerge decades later to discover to their amazement that the war was over.

These stories bring to mind the Senate of Canada.

Book Review: Petty and Profound

What do municipalities and First Nation reserves have in common? Both are used to being told what to do. It’s natural, then, that any review of Indigenous self-government would examine how these two get along at the most elemental level. A Quiet Evolution is the first research of its kind, and prompts the reader to wonder why nobody thought of this before.

Dealing with those who fail Kellie Leitch’s Canadian values test

Think what you will about Dr. Kellie Leitch, the Conservative MP from rural Ontario who is running for Stephen Harper’s old job. At least she is not afraid to be different.

A pediatric orthopedic surgeon from Western University in London, Ont., Leitch was parachuted into Simcoe-Grey constituency in 2011 after Harper threw the previous MP, Helena Guergis, under the bus for causing him public embarrassment. Two years later, Leitch was promoted to the cabinet as Minister of Labour and the Status of Women.

Releasing diplomatic secrets: better late than never?

Distance lends enchantment in matters of the heart, or so they say, while in matters political, distance is said to lend perspective.

Ambassadors and other foreign service emissaries are valued for their ability to provide their government at home with an informed, detached perspective of the policies, problems and personalities of the country where they are posted.