Provincial Politics

Behold brave Horatius Ford at the Bridge!

Premier Doug Ford,
Queen’s Park,
Toronto

My Very Dear Premier Ford,

I fear I have neglected you terribly. When you scored your historic victory back on June 7, 2018, punting the evil Liberals into outer darkness and restoring democracy and good government to our province, I promised to provide you with regular readings from the applause meters we have installed across Ford Nation.

Desire for change may bring a new Crosbie to power in Newfoundland

There is an even chance that, when voters in Newfoundland and Labrador go to the polls in their provincial election on Thursday, they will give the boot to the four-year-old Liberal government of Premier Dwight Ball and elect the Progressive Conservatives under Ches Crosbie.

New parties can form effective governments

Canadian provincial politics has a rich history of come-from-behind parties emerging from the margins to occupy the epicentre of power. The Greens are poised to show the rest of Canada that it can happen in P.E.I. as well.

And while the Greens may appear to lack any experience in governing, this, history shows, is not always a disqualification for office.

New, untested parties have formed effective governments. A look back into the history of provincial politics in Canada shows that the seemingly improbable can become fairly mainstream and practical.

A political tale of swamp creatures and squirrels

Hon. Doug Ford
Premier of Ontario
Queen’s Park
Toronto

My Dear Premier Ford,

I beg you to accept my apologies for ignoring you.  Here you are about to present your 2019 budget, wherein you will unpeel the next layer of your vision for Ontario, and I have not offered you a scintilla of counsel. Mea culpa. (That’s Latin for “open for business,” Sir.)

It’s time to Make Ontario Great Again

Hon. Doug Ford,
Queen’s Park,
Toronto, Ontario

My dear Premier Ford:

It’s me again, Sir, your faithful fan out here in the foothills of Ford Nation.

I’ve already written to you a couple of times, first to commend your efforts to return Ontario to the glories of the 1950s, and subsequently to endorse your invocation of the notwithstanding clause to subdue that twit, John Tory, the mayor of Toronto.