Geoffrey Stevens's blog

Make the rich pay? A lovely idea, but not this year

A national election campaign is, or should be, the centrepiece of our democratic system, a time when great and important ideas – policies vital to the nation’s future – are debated before the jury of electors.

That’s the theory. In practice, big ideas make most political leaders nervous, especially during elections. They find it expedient to narrow their focus, to emphasize proposals with immediate or short-term electoral appeal, and to expend their energy on attacking their opponents.  

The current 2019 exercise in democracy is following the familiar pattern.

Yes, Americans deserve better and so do Canadians

“Because America deserves better.”

That’s the campaign slogan of Bill Weld, the former (1991-1997) governor of Massachusetts, who made it official last week. He is doing what other Republicans – congressmen, senators, governors – milquetoast politicians all of them, fear to do. He is challenging Donald Trump for the party’s 2020 presidential nomination.

A political tale of swamp creatures and squirrels

Hon. Doug Ford
Premier of Ontario
Queen’s Park
Toronto

My Dear Premier Ford,

I beg you to accept my apologies for ignoring you.  Here you are about to present your 2019 budget, wherein you will unpeel the next layer of your vision for Ontario, and I have not offered you a scintilla of counsel. Mea culpa. (That’s Latin for “open for business,” Sir.)

On track to defeat, Liberals have to dump Wilson-Raybould and Philpott

“Can't anybody here play this game?” – Baseball savant Casey Stengel

Poor Casey suffered the misfortune of being the manager of the 1962 New York Mets, an expansion team with a 40-120 won-lost record and a label as the worst team in major league baseball history.

This is a stretch, I admit, but it seems to me that Stengel’s question – “Can’t anybody here play this game?” – could be asked of the 2019 version of the Liberal Party of Canada managed by Justin Trudeau.