Geoffrey Stevens's blog

Trump and O’Leary: two rich men toying with the middle class?

Arlene Dickinson, star of CBC’s Dragons’ Den, wasted little time putting her former co-star in his place when she was asked what she thought of Kevin O’Leary’s entry into the Conservative leadership race last week.

“For seven years, I sat shoulder to shoulder with Kevin,” she said. “We'd spend long hours together, listening to hardworking Canadian entrepreneurs pitch their businesses, which, all too often, led to real-life stories of enormous struggle.

It’s the silly season in Ottawa

Opposition MPs are cheerfully beating up the Prime Minister over his family’s post-Christmas vacation.

They contend he violated conflict-of-interest rules by, first, accepting the invitation of the Aga Khan to be his guests on his private island in the Bahamas, and, second, by travelling on their host’s private helicopter between Nassau and Bell Island, 120 kilometres away, without obtaining approval in advance from the Commons conflict of interest and ethics commissioner.

Forget about the Aga Khan; Trudeau needs to return to reality

One of the trickiest questions in politics concerns where to draw the line between the public’s right to know and the politicians’ right to privacy.

The question is not a new one. It is an active concern in Washington where President-elect Donald Trump’s many private business activities – not to mention the involvement of his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, a big-time real estate investor, with mysterious Chinese financiers – reek of conflict-of-interest.

He’s a dream leadership candidate, but he won’t run

Imagine, if you can, gentle reader, that you are a card-carrying member of the Conservative Party of Canada. You are looking anxiously for a permanent replacement for Stephen Harper in the CPC leadership election this coming May. You have studied the swollen field – no fewer than 13 candidates at last count. Regretfully, all seem to lack at least one crucial ingredient. 

Kathleen Wynne, Ontario Liberals are in dire straits

Anyone who has made a career in politics will tell you that two of the most difficult decisions involve timing: when to get in and when to get out. 

Of the two, the getting-out decision is often the more difficult. 

Canadians saw evidence of that back in the 1960s when John Diefenbaker, a former prime minister, could not bring himself to relinquish the leadership of the Progressive Conservative party. He challenged the party to throw him out, and it did.